http://www.iahf.com/anh_lawsuit.html We have til July to generate donations for this all important lawsuit to overturn the EU FSD.

Also see this: Mega Trouble Down Under- 1,363 dietary supplements just removed from Aussie health food store shelves, 80% of their stock, 5,000 stores could be bankrupted within 6 months due to TGA's fraudulent action. We're under serious global attack:


Massive Multinational Assault
on Alternative Medicines

Australians deliberately denied access to more than one thousand products ranging from vitamin pills to multi-mineral supplements

Copyright Joe Vialls, 2 May 2003

Original article at http://homepage.ntlworld.com/steveseymour/subliminalsuggestion/vitamins.html

 Travacalm

From this...

 Shopping cart with vitamins

...to this...

 Empty vitamin shelves

...to this...

In less than seven days! " The ever-compliant media immediately started circulating rumors about 'that dangerous Travacalm', and hinted at mixing machines not being cleaned properly between blending batches of different products. One former employee was produced on television, to state that he was only allowed one hour to clean his mixing machine between batches instead of three hours, and that was that. The media fix was in, despite a total lack of evidence."

Under cover of the fake "SARS Crisis" currently saturating the western media, Australia's Therapeutic Goods Administration has suddenly moved to outlaw and remove from store shelves about 80% of all vitamin and other related alternative products. Although less than a week ago customers were happily buying everything from vitamin A to G, and enthusiastically chewing every conceivable mineral and trace element, these same customers today face empty shelves in more than 5,000 health food stores across the nation.

American and European readers who may be wondering "What has this Australian stuff got to do with me?" are urged to read on a little further. Australia is well known as a gullible and thus attractive proving ground for multinational scams, meaning that what happens in Oz this week, might well serve as a foretaste of what is yet to come in America and Europe next week, or next month, or even next year.

The extraordinary situation facing Australians today, started at the beginning of this week, when the Therapeutic Goods Administration [TGA] suddenly decided to cancel the manufacturing license of Pan Pharmaceuticals, a large Australian company which not only manufactures its own line of medicines, but also provides a manufacturing service for 80% of all alternative goods providers across Australia. Basically then, by shutting down Pan Pharmaceuticals without just cause, the TGA ensured that alternative health goods purveyors and customers would be critically disadvantaged across the entire nation.

To suggest [or even think] that the TGA action was deliberately designed to shut down natural health products in favor of the huge pharmaceutical multinationals and their coal-tar synthetic drugs, at first seems ill advised, perhaps even absurd. But unfortunately for the TGA, we can and will prove in a proper step-by-step investigation, that the shutdown process was premeditated and deliberate.

Members of the Therapeutic Goods Administration are Australia's medical goods "thought police", endowed by government with incredible powers. There are documented examples of these people shutting down retail health food businesses for daring to suggest that cheap apricot kernels might retard [not "cure"] cancer, while at the same time other members of the TGA were busy endorsing the massive use of highly-addictive and extremely profitable amphetamines on Australian children, with alleged but unproven "learning disorders".

Every scam needs a convincing trigger to start the desired chain of events. In the case of Pan Pharmaceuticals the trigger was an in-house medicine called "Travacalm", designed as its name suggests to combat motion sickness in its various manifestations. The TGA allegedly received complaints in late 2002 about this medicine, including claims of minor "hallucinations". In an apparent response to these uncorroborated claims, on 21 January 2003 Travacalm Original tablets AUST R 78192 were recalled, with the official reason given as "The product is being recalled following a number of reports of excess side effects related to the active ingredient."

Fine so far, and the TGA certainly seemed to be acting responsibly, but it was not. You see, there are actually three versions of Travacalm, but only the "Original" version was recalled. Travacalm Original is unique in its active ingredient dimenhydrinate, which is not contained in Travacalm H.O [hyoscine hydrobromide], or in Travacalm Natural, which contains only zingiber officinale [natural ginger].

 Travacalm product line

So by banning Travacalm Original but not the other two Travacalm products, the TGA revealed to us all that it was really only banning the single ingredient dimenhydrinate, the active antihistamine not present in either the H.O. or Natural versions of Travacalm.

There is nothing unique or secret about the side effects of dimenhydrinate, which have been known for many years. Users can be subject to headache, blurred vision, palpitations, loss of coordination, dry mouth, low blood pressure causing dizziness and weakness, and ringing in the ears. What are less widely known, are the disturbing hallucinogenic side effects of dimenhydrinate experienced by many experimental users with access to the Internet. A good description is posted at http://www.angelfire.com/ca7/legalize/drugs/dimenhydrinate/ "It takes about an hour for the full effects of this drug to be reached, maybe even more. You know when it hits you though. The most screwed up thing is a complete loss of balance. Walking around without falling on your ass is quite the challenge. Small hallucinations are possible (your pen sprouts legs and begins a journey across your desk). And auditory hallucinations (hearing s) come into the picture at higher doses. "Short-term memory is shot to f. As soon as you finish a thought, you forget what it was you were thinking about. To the casual observer, you would look quite weird. Slack-jawed, red faced, dilated pupils, possibly a hunched posture, maybe even drooling. The feeling is like floating on a cloud during a hurricane (or something to that effect)."

Obviously then, all medications including dimenhydrinate are potentially very dangerous and capable of producing hallucinations, which leads us to question why it was that on 21 January 2003, the Australian Therapeutic Goods Administration recalled only Pan Pharmaceutical's Travacalm Original, while leaving other medicines with higher levels of dimenhydrinate on the open market.

These other dimenhydrinate medicines include [but are not limited to] Calm X, Dimetabs, Dinate, Dommanate, Dramamine, Dramanate, Dramocen, Dramoject, Dymenate, Hydrate, Marmine, Nico-Vert, Tega-Vert, Triptone, and Vertab. All without exception should also have been ordered off the shelves, but were not.

Predictably perhaps, all of the other dimenhydrinate medicines are manufactured by pharmaceutical multinationals "friendly" to members of the Therapeutic Goods Administration, and unconfirmed rumors still persist about certain senior TGA bureaucrats being discreetly provided with free "medical seminars" in Fiji or Bali, complete with all essential extras including unlimited alcohol and prostitutes.

Regardless of the fine detail of exactly how this situation was engineered, by February 2003 Australian Pan Pharmaceuticals had been artificially "dirtied", and was ripe for the picking. The scene had been set for the biggest recall of natural health products in Australia - perhaps in the world. The scam itself started on Monday 28 April, and a mere four days later on Thursday 1 May, the TGA had identified and ordered 1,363 complete product lines to be stripped from store shelves acros Australia. Does anyone out there really believe that a bunch of lazy bureaucrats managed all that in four days, without considerable forward planning?

 Pan corporate headquarters

So by Thursday 1 May, one thousand three hundred and sixty-three complete product lines had been officially recalled, meaning hundreds of millions of alternative health pills and capsules had to be stripped from the shelves, leaving Australian consumers understandably anxious. To claim that this TGA action "undermined public confidence in alternative health", would be seriously understating the case.

Naturally the Therapeutic Goods Administration provided no details of why this was happening, though the ever-compliant media immediately started circulating rumors about "that dangerous Travacalm", and hinted at mixing machines not being cleaned properly between blending batches of different products. One former employee was produced on television, to state that he was only allowed one hour to clean his mixing machine between batches instead of three hours, and that was that. The media fix was in, despite a total lack of evidence.

Hundreds of thousands of Australians were suddenly deprived of the ability to buy their chosen alternative health products, and "doubt" had also been deliberately cast over the safety of the alternative health products already in their homes. Many Australians started to grumble that the alternative health manufacturers were no better than the hated drug companies: all of them obviously out to make a quick buck without the slightest regard for public safety. Lines of demarcation became blurred, and customers started to mill around like lost sheep.

Hard evidence to hand indicates that the undermining of public confidence, and the resulting confusion, were the prime object of the exercise, because there is no proof that any of these 1,363 product lines pose the slightest risk to human health. Ironically perhaps, in its headlong rush to shepherd Australians back towards out-of-fashion medical doctors and their wide range of synthetic coal-tar based drugs, the Therapeutic Goods Administration reinforced the reality of perfect safety with official statements.

Putting its foot firmly in its mouth, the TGA publicly announced three times in less than a week, "there are no problems with prescription drugs obtained from your doctor", and "prescription drugs are not affected". This was unquestionably reassuring news for potential patients being herded back towards the medical profession, and even greater news for the pharmaceutical multinationals, who up to this point in history have been losing A$2,000 million per year in Australia alone to alternative health products.

Unfortunately there was a fatal flaw in these glib and very convenient TGA statements. Though Pan Pharmaceuticals is best known for its own alternative health products, and as a contract manufacturer for 80% of all other alternative health products across Australia, it is also a significant producer of a wide range of in-house and contract "prescription drugs". Those prescription drugs manufactured by Pan are still in your doctor's surgery, and they are still on the shelves at the pharmacy, despite the startling fact that all were produced in the same allegedly "unclean" mixing machines as the 1,363 banned alternative health products.

In summary, the Australian Therapeutic Goods Administration recalled a Pan dimenhydrinate product in January 2003 but failed to recall its fifteen multinational equivalents at the same time. The TGA also failed to issue a public warning about the possible hallucinogenic side effects of dimenhydrinate. In late April the Therapeutic Goods Administration started a whispering campaign against Pan Pharmaceuticals, with the intent of severely undermining public confidence in alternative health products. This latter claim has now been proved by the selective TGA recall of all 1,363 Pan Pharmaceutical alternative health products, but without the recall of a single Pan Pharmaceutical "prescription medicine".

It is difficult to forecast the long-term outcome of this deliberate campaign, because no one yet knows what the multinational pharmaceutical corporations will instruct the Australian TGA to do next. Certainly the massed media campaign has already severely undermined Australian public confidence in alternative health products, and for a few weeks or months it will be very difficult [in some cases impossible], to even purchase fresh stocks of vitamins, minerals and so on. In turn, this forced lack of trade will send thousands of small alternative health retails outlets into bankruptcy.

Using these techniques, the multinational pharmaceuticals seek to "break the alternative consumer habit" if possible, and to an extent they will be successful. The "hard core" alternative crowd will not respond of course, and if necessary will import their own products, but it is not the "hard core" that the multinationals seek to undermine.

It is "middle" Australia [and America and Europe] that the multinationals are targeting. Millions of intelligent folk who used to go to medical doctors all the time, until they started to pick up the warning signs of the horrific side-effects of prescription medicines. These are the people who must be weaned off healthy products, and brought back under direct medical control.

The fake Australian Therapeutic Goods Administration scam will certainly help to do this, and if only 50% effective, should still return roughly one billion dollars per annum to multinational pharmaceutical investors. Not a bad return for the price of a few hookers in Fiji and Bali.